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Posted on: September 29, 2020

Halloween 2020 Recommendations

happy halloween (JPG)

The Village of Lombard has received inquiries regarding trick-or-treating during the COVID-19 Pandemic.  Below are reminders from the Village, and recommendations from the Illinois Department of Public Health and the CDC.

  • Trick or treating is a cultural practice and custom that is not organized or formally regulated by the Village of Lombard.  While the Village has annually recommended trick-or-treating hours from 3-7 p.m., to help keep our community safe, there is no official policy or ordinance in place with designated or enforceable hours, beyond recommended guidance.
  • The Village’s top priority is resident safety. Ultimately, each resident must make the decision as to whether or not they would like to engage in Halloween activities, and if so, how.
  • If you choose to trick-or-treat on Halloween night, please take extra precautions to maintain social distance, wear masks, avoid touching of the face (mouth/nose/eyes), and use hand sanitizer often.
  • trick or treating flyer (JPG)Citizens not wishing to participate in trick-or-treating may turn off their porch lights and close their door to indicate their non-participation. Additionally, households that do not wish to participate may also hang a sign upon their door indicating their intent not to participate.   
  • If your household chooses to participate in trick-or-treating, wear a mask or face covering while handing out candy, wash your hands frequently, and disinfect high touch surfaces outside your home (such as doorbells, doorknobs and buzzers).


The Illinois Department of Public Health is reminding residents:

  • If you think you could have COVID-19 or may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should not participate in in-person Halloween festivities and should not give out candy to trick-or-treaters.  Individuals at increased risk for severe illness should not attend in-person Halloween gatherings.
  • Anyone participating in trick-or-treating, including those passing out candy, should maintain 6-feet of social distance and wear proper face coverings.
  • Consider leaving individually wrapped candy (spaced apart) on a table in driveways or in front of walkways, sidewalks, or any outdoor space where 6-feet of distance can be maintained.
  • A Halloween costume mask is not a substitute for a cloth mask. Ensure that breathing is not impaired if a cloth mask is worn under a costume mask. If so, discard the costume mask.
  • Trick-or-treat in groups with household members only.
  • Candy collected during trick-or-treating should not be eaten until after handwashing.
  • Halloween haunted houses currently are not allowed in Restore Illinois Phase 4 Guidelines.
  • Consider open-air, one-way haunted forests or haunted walks where 6-feet of distance can be maintained and face coverings are used.

Adult costume parties, social gatherings, Halloween parties at bars:

  • Gatherings of more than 50 people or 50% or more of a building’s maximum occupancy are prohibited. (Lower limits may apply for regions in additional mitigation.)
  • The more time you spend at a gathering, the closer the contact, the more people, the higher your risk of exposure to COVID-19.
  • Follow small social gathering safety tips from IDPH

Pumpkin patches and orchards

  • Cloth face coverings and social distancing should be enforced.
  • Use hand sanitizer before handling pumpkins, apples, and other produce.

Hayrides

  • Hayrides should not exceed 50% capacity with parties spaced at least six feet apart.
  • Wear face coverings at all times when around people not from your household.

After participating in any of the above activities, if you think that you may have been exposed during your celebration, take extra precautions for 14 days after the event to help protect others. You should:

  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • Avoid being around people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Consider getting tested for COVID-19.


Reminders from the Village of Lombard

Respecting Fellow Neighbors

Residents are reminded not to approach homes or knock on doors of homes that have “no trick-or-treating” signs posted, or homes that have their exterior lights off and front doors closed.   Please treat all neighbors with respect and courtesy.

Pedestrian Safety 

If you plan on being outside on Halloween, plan ahead to use flashlights, add reflective tape to costumes, limit exposure to others and watch carefully for vehicular traffic. Children should not wear costumes that restrict their vision or ability to walk. All costume accessories should be made of soft material. All pedestrians should utilize sidewalks, and should cross streets at corners by utilizing traffic signals and crosswalks.

Halloween Motorist Safety 

Motorists should drive slowly and watch for pedestrians. Lombard Police Officers will have extra officers on the road, cracking down on impaired drivers as part of the 2020 Halloween Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Campaign.

Looking Forward 

Since COVID-19 has impacted our society, we have missed out on many community and family traditions.  We understand that this situation is not what anyone had hoped for, however we hope that you will act kindly and courteously in helping to keep your neighbors safe and respect their personal choices. We are all looking forward to the day when we can once again safely come together to fully enjoy community celebrations and traditions.  For additional information and updates regarding public health restrictions or guidance on Halloween trick-or-treating, please visit www.villageoflombard.org/halloween..


CDC Guidelines for Halloween During COVID-19

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays.html#halloween 

Many traditional Halloween activities can be high-risk for spreading viruses. There are several safer, alternative ways to participate in Halloween. If you may have COVID-19 or you may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should not participate in in-person Halloween festivities and should not give out candy to trick-or-treaters.

Lower risk activities

These lower risk activities can be safe alternatives:

  • Carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household and displaying them
  • Carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe distance, with neighbors or friends
  • Decorating your house, apartment, or living space
  • Doing a Halloween scavenger hunt where children are given lists of Halloween-themed things to look for while they walk outdoors from house to house admiring Halloween decorations at a distance
  • Having a virtual Halloween costume contest
  • Having a Halloween movie night with people you live with
  • Having a scavenger hunt-style trick-or-treat search with your household members in or around your home rather than going house to house

Moderate risk activities

  • Participating in one-way trick-or-treating where individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up for families to grab and go while continuing to social distance (such as at the end of a driveway or at the edge of a yard)
    • If you are preparing goodie bags, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 second before and after preparing the bags.
  • Having a small group, outdoor, open-air costume parade where people are distanced more than 6 feet apart
  • Attending a costume party held outdoors where protective masks are used and people can remain more than 6 feet apart
    • A costume mask (such as for Halloween) is not a substitute for a cloth mask. A costume mask should not be used unless it is made of two or more layers of breathable fabric that covers the mouth and nose and doesn’t leave gaps around the face.
    • Do not wear a costume mask over a protective cloth mask because it can be dangerous if the costume mask makes it hard to breathe. Instead, consider using a Halloween-themed cloth mask.
  • Going to an open-air, one-way, walk-through haunted forest where appropriate mask use is enforced, and people can remain more than 6 feet apart
    • If screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised. The greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus.
  • Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or picking apples, wearing masks is encouraged or enforced, and people are able to maintain social distancing
  • Having an outdoor Halloween movie night with local family friends with people spaced at least 6 feet apart
    • If screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised. The greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus.
    • Lower your risk by following CDC’s recommendations on hosting gatherings or cook-outs.

Higher risk activities

Avoid these higher risk activities to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19:

  • Participating in traditional trick-or-treating where treats are handed to children who go door to door
  • Having trunk-or-treat where treats are handed out from trunks of cars lined up in large parking lots
  • Attending crowded costume parties held indoors
  • Going to an indoor haunted house where people may be crowded together and screaming
  • Going on hayrides or tractor rides with people who are not in your household
  • Using alcohol or drugs, which can cloud judgement and increase risky behaviors
  • Traveling to a rural fall festival that is not in your community if you live in an area with community spread of COVID-19

 

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